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Re: Victorian Era Question

February 13, 2015 12:09AM
Yes she would have a companion. In some ways the etiquette was even stricter than Regency, if more relaxed in others. Single men and women would travel together in a private compartment [not a train car in England] if it couldn't be avoided, but of course the conductor would be able to glance in. It would not be done at all to have the shades down on the door to the corridor or heaven forfend, locked. Of course if they are related, less problem. One did not, in general, hire a whole carriage. One might, however, charter a special train if it was needed to get somewhere quickly - as Sherlock Holmes has been known to do. If a lady was unwell and wanted the blinds down, it behoved any male with her to remove himself to a public part of the train, even if that meant standing. chivalry dictated he should stand outside her compartment, to prevent anyone going in who should not.
A compartment is two bench seats facing each other with the luggage above. each bench seat seats 3 people, so in theory 6 people to a compartment. You have to be quite friendly. [the rolling stock in Romania is very similar to Victorian rolling stock if you ever get the opportunity to visit, or it was when I was last there.] A sleeping compartment for a night train has two bunk beds, the seat one side converts into a bunk, and another descends from the luggage rack region. Posh sleepers are purpose made and an upper class person would have a sleeping compartment and an apartment in which to spend the daytime if the journey was prolonged. These were not common in England, but were on the continent. Because you only really need a sleeper for going to Scotland and that was only overnight once, so the converting compartments were quite sufficient. And please remember that it wasn't the Flyng Scotsman that first went 100mph, but the City of Truro though that wasn't until 1905. Hmm, shutting up about that now before I make too many anoraky remarks about steam engines...

I don't know the book/movie, but travelling to the continent for the wealthy was quite common. There was the boat train which ran regularly, and one took the boat across to Calais where the train was scheduled to meet it. One did the historic capitals and places of interest as well as watering holes like Biarritz. The English might be found anywhere in Europe and occasionally further afield. Places like Romania were a trifle too exotic for most people, but France, Italy, Germay and Austria were frequently visited.

Sherlock Holmes is probably one of your best sources. Also Jerome K Jerome's Three Men on the Bummel [a sequel to Three Men in a Boat] and covering a tour of Germany. With all the royal families being interrelated, there was a more or less universal society into which the upper crust fitted. All would have spoken French, which was very much the Lingua Franca [literally] of the day.
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Victorian Era Question

SharonElaineFebruary 12, 2015 05:04PM

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Sarah WaldockFebruary 13, 2015 11:56PM

Re: Victorian Era Question

Sarah WaldockFebruary 13, 2015 12:09AM

Re: Victorian Era Question

SharonElaineFebruary 13, 2015 03:14AM

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Sarah WaldockFebruary 13, 2015 11:55PM

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Harvey S.February 14, 2015 04:58PM

Re: Victorian Era Question

PeterFebruary 14, 2015 07:02PM



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